Spotlight: Star Trek Discovery Season 1 (Full Season)

Warning: some spoilers for the first season of “Discovery” follow.  Read at your own risk.

Space…the final frontier.

I mentioned this already when I did a brief review of the first three episodes, but “Star Trek: Discovery” initially inspired little more than skepticism in me.  It seemed like it was going to go too hard into the dark and edgy territory, forgetting what Star Trek’s roots were all about.  But after watching the entire season, I can safely say my fears were completely unfounded.

“Discovery” not only succeeds as a show, but proves that Star Trek still has a place in modern television.

 

Reusing old images is fun!

 

Back when I reviewed the first three episodes, I said that the two-part premiere had some rough spots.  And, looking back on the season as a whole, I can definitely say that it is probably the weakest of the entire season.  It does its job well enough, but it throws a lot of elements at you at once.  It sets the tone for the rest of the season, and gives the crew of the Discovery motivation to do what they’re doing.

I won’t spoil too much, but suffice it to say that Burnham’s character becomes infamous after the events of the two-part premiere.  She’s being carted off to a new prison roughly six months later when her trip is interrupted and she finds herself on-board the USS Discovery on the whim of its captain, Gabriel Lorca.  He offers her a position on the ship, which she initially refuses but quickly comes to terms with what her options are and decides to accept.

At first I thought the show was going to revolve around the mystery of Discovery and what was happening on the ship, because the first episode (episode three) that features the ship gives it a very mysterious air.  But the mystery of what the ship is working on is very quickly revealed.  I wouldn’t call it a detriment though, as most shows that hinge on a mystery like that tend to get drawn out and stale.  Rather, dealing with it sooner allows “Discovery” to move forward and into new territory.  And that seems to be a common theme.  The show shifts and changes as the season goes in, due in large part to some serious re-tooling going on behind the scenes.  The original show runner, Bryan Fuller, was asked to leave the show about a year before it premiered.  Some of his original ideas were left in place, but the show seemed to struggle with them.  Eventually, it seems that the show moved off in a different direction, and all for the better.  The second half of the season is even better than the first.

One of the greatest successes of “Discovery” comes in how it was able to combine the meaningful plots of the older Star Trek shows with the lighter, more action-oriented pacing of modern television.  But what might be an even bigger success is how it managed to create an appealing, engaging cast of characters so quickly.  Paul Stammets, Discovery‘s engineer, is a breakout favorite among show watchers, but I grew particularly fond of Sylvia Tilly as well.

 

Sylvia Tilly

 

Tilly is one of those characters whose defining trait upon first meeting her is her social awkwardness.  She talks a lot when she’s nervous.  Much like my initial reaction to “Discovery” as a whole, I was prepared to grate my teeth and be annoyed by her character, because television shows usually play up this trait so much it becomes annoying.  But Tilly becomes a great character in her own, taking on the mantle of Stammets’ protege.  She is often a source of comic relief, but doesn’t become the useless character I feared she might.  She’s actually given a decent amount to do.  And later on in the season, when Stammets is out of commission for a time, she is given an opportunity to show off what she knows and directly contributes to the success of the ship’s missions.

One of my favorite scenes with her happens fairly early on in the season.  Take a look.

Speaking of characters, it’s also one of the only major places where “Discovery” drops the ball.  Most of the show’s issues can be chalked up to the re-tooling going on behind the scenes and are forgivable.  But there are a couple of character arcs that could have been better.  For instance, Michael Burnham herself, who functions as the lens through which the audience views everything.  I mentioned before that Burnham becomes infamous after the premiere episode, and that’s due to a key choice she decides to make.  Well, at the end of the season the show attempts to tie together her character arc, insisting that she’s learned a lesson about violating principles and that her character is a better person for it.  And that’s nice and all, but I don’t feel like it’s entirely earned.  After the premiere and first couple of episodes, Burnham’s character development is mostly left on the back-burner in favor of the rest of Discovery‘s crew.  Sure, she’s is typically front and center when it comes to the action sequences, but it isn’t really until near the halfway mark when she gets a love interest that her character begins to show more development.  The second half of the season definitely showcases it better, giving her situations of moral complexity that force her to make decisions based on her principles.  But the sudden “I’ve learned my lesson” speech in the season finale seems a little misguided to me.

Another disappointment comes in the form of Discovery‘s captain, Lorca.  When he’s first introduced, there’s a distinct air of mystery around the character.  What his motivations are and why he decided to recruit Burnham in the first place are some of the questions that go unanswered for most of the season.  The only problem is, once the mystery around him is cleared up, Lorca becomes a very one-note character, almost cartoonish in a way.  It’s a disappointing endpoint for such an ambiguous and interesting character.

I could go on and on about “Discovery”, but I’ll spare you the time.  All I’ll say is that it’s definitely worth a watch, especially for those Star Trek fans who have been pining for a new show ever since “Enterprise” ended back in 2005.  It doesn’t do everything right, but everything that is there is damn good.  It’s a first season worthy of the Star Trek name, and I’m glad that they wrapped up the major plot lines in the season so that with the second one, they can go in newer and better directions.

Because let’s face it: an entire show about a war would get tiring eventually.

 

Thanks for reading!  Check back on the third Wednesday of March for another post, and as always, have a wonderful month.

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Spotlight: Star Trek Discovery (first three episodes)

It’s been a long time coming.

“Star Trek: Discovery” is the first Star Trek television series to air since the end of “Star Trek: Enterprise”, which ended its run twelve years ago back in 2005.  In terms of its place within the Star Trek universe, “Discovery” is set between “Enterprise” and the original “Star Trek” television show.  And it has nothing to do with the reboot movies.

But the question is, was the wait worth it?

 

The USS Discovery.

 

I must admit…I was initially skeptical of the show when I saw previews of it.  I was afraid it was going to go too far into the dark, gritty realm of things.  But after watching the first three episodes, I can safely say that while the tone is a bit more grim than the usual Star Trek fare, it works for the time period of the show.

When the show starts, we find ourselves not actually on board the Discovery, but rather a ship known as the USS Shenzhou.  The first two episodes can basically be considered one as they form a two-part pilot which serves as a prologue to the series.  In the first two episodes, we meet Michael Burnham (played by Sonequa Martin-Green) the first officer of the Shenzhou, who is quickly established as the main character and the lens through which we view most of the events.

The two-part prologue does a good job of setting the backdrop for the rest of the series.  We see the Shenzhou encounter the Klingons, an encounter which sets into motion the war between the Klingons and the Federation (something fans will remember being part of the original series as well).  To be fair, the first two episodes are a bit uneven.  There’s a little too much witty quipping at the beginning for my liking, and some moments feel a bit rushed for time’s sake.  An example of this would be from the second episode when the Vulcan character Sarek, who from what I can tell was Burnham’s mentor as a child, telepathically speaks to her over thousands of light-years because they once melded minds a long time ago.  It’s a scene that just feels out of place and weird, not to mention its only purpose is so that Sarek can essentially tell Burnham not to give up.

Speaking of Burnham’s childhood, that’s something the pilot episodes handle really well.  We get snippets of Burnham’s past which fleshes out her character as someone who has experienced tragedy and hardship, as well as dealing with differences between cultures (Burnham ends up living with Vulcans for some years).  It helps set her up as a conflicted and nuanced character, one who will make drastic decisions whose consequences impact the arc of the show.  I would have liked a little more time spent on these however, as most of the flashbacks last less than a minute.

 

Michael Burnham

 

I don’t want to say too much more about the first two episodes so as not to spoil it for people who haven’t watched it yet, so let’s move on to the third episode.  While the first two episodes feel more similar to the recent Star Trek movies, the third episode introduces us to the meat of the show.  It picks up six months after the events of the pilot.  Burnham’s circumstances have changed a lot, and against her will she finds herself suddenly on board the USS Discovery.  There, she meets Captain Gabriel Lorca, who is immediately mysterious about his motivations.  In fact, Discovery’s whole mission is shrouded in mystery.  In the third episode we do get a decent bit of information about what Discovery is trying to do, but even so at the end of the episode it’s hinted that there might be more going on.

In terms of quality, the third episode is definitely the best.  It’s the most consistent and engaging of the three I’ve seen, and it sets up a nice, enticing mystery for us to get invested in.  Some might object to the whole “science co-opted by military” theme going on, but I think it makes sense considering the time period.  Starfleet is desperate for an edge in the war against the Klingons, so it makes sense that they might resort to more drastic measures.  And I like the idea that no one is perfect.  Sure, everyone loves Captain Kirk and Captain Picard, but they were men for a different time.  Television is much different than it was back in their eras, so it wouldn’t make sense to just replicate their shows but with higher quality effects.  Hardcore Trek fans may nitpick on a lot of things, but Star Trek needs to show that it has a place in a more nuanced storytelling landscape.

My only major concern with the series is that, due to it being a prequel to the older Trek Shows (aside from “Enterprise), everything they do might turn out to be moot.  For example, that big information reveal in the third episode revolves around the Discovery’s main experiment, something that would give them a drastic edge in the war against the Klingons.  Only we know that it can’t work out because it’s never used at all in any of the other shows.  My fear is that this will become a recurring trend with “Discovery”.  They’ll build up these new, awesome experiments Discovery is doing, only they’ll all fail because the continuity of the Star Trek universe demands it.

That being said, one of the small things I enjoyed was that “Discovery” has elements of wonder in it, something that I missed from the recent movies (which are basically just sci-fi action flicks with a Star Trek skin).  There’s a scene in the first episode where Burnham is struck with awe at the majesty of space, and it’s something that stuck out to me.  Hopefully, that sense of wonder doesn’t get completely lost in the mix, because it was a crucial element to why I liked Star Trek in the first place.

I have been impressed with what I’ve seen so far, so I highly recommend it to any sci-fi fans looking for a new show.  Sure, you have to subscribe to CBS’s All Access program to watch it, but if there was one show that would make it worth it, it’s “Discovery”.

Although there are…other ways you could watch the show.  Don’t worry, I won’t tell.

 

Thanks for reading.  Check back next Wednesday for another post, and as always, have a wonderful week.

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