Let’s Talk About the Generational Divide

I’ve been thinking a bit lately about the constant battle between the generations.  You know what I mean, the age old “back in my day” and “kids these days”.  Every generation seems to think they’re the only ones with their heads on straight and all the others after them are just doing it wrong.  It even goes the other way, with younger generations being bitter towards the older because of a perceived lack of forethought on their part, with their past actions affecting the younger generations in a wide variety of ways, not all of them good.  It’s no secret (or at least it shouldn’t be) that the situation of millennials is a bit screwed, with the cost of living continually going up but wages not keeping the same pace.  All of this leads to a lot of back and forth between young and old, and a lot of resentful feelings.

 

 

“I’m gonna get those dang kids…”

 

I remember when I was younger, video games were often the target of politicians and activists, with both claiming that they warped kid’s brains and made them violent.  Of course, the science never truly backed that up, but it didn’t stop them nonetheless.  It was a new thing that the older folks didn’t understand, and therefore it was dangerous.  They didn’t have video games when they were growing up, so it must just be some fad thing that the kids are into these days.  And as time went on and it became more apparent that video games were here to stay, they drew more and more criticism from people who probably never played a single game in their lives.

It’s the same with tablets and smart phones in today’s world.  I can’t count the amount of times I’ve rolled my eyes when someone says something like “kids these days don’t get outside anymore…they just sit in front of their computer screens and waste away”.  Yeah because clearly your generation was the only one that got it right.  Everyone else is just stupid.

Wait, which generation thought spanking was an acceptable idea again?  I forget.

 

 

The thing is, it also goes the other way.  Often we of the younger generations are bitter towards our elders because we see them as the root cause for a lot of the issues facing us: climate change, student debt, the rising cost of living, and so on.  We felt like we were dealt a bad hand, and that older people just don’t understand that.  So we’re bitter, resentful, and grumpy about our lot in life.

“You ruined the planet, and now we have to pick up the pieces,” we often say.

But here’s the kicker: neither side is technically wrong in this.

 

It’s true, the actions of older generations did have a lot to do with the current climate we live in today, economically and otherwise.  But at the same time, there was likely no good way to predict the effects their choices would have thirty or so years down the line.  However, there is something to be said about self-awareness, about accepting the fact that choices were made which directly led to the predicament the younger generations are in now.

And the older generations aren’t wrong in the idea that new and popular things should be approached with at least a modicum of caution.  Until we know for certain what the effects can be, it might not be wise to simply adopt some new thing or idea without really understanding the ramifications.  But again, immediately assuming that it is bad and rallying against it isn’t the answer either.

It all has to do with understanding.  Understanding goes a long way toward solving our issues.  We should understand that different life situations lead to different mindsets, and one isn’t necessarily better than the other.  We should understand that, for us as human beings, it’s difficult to chart what effect our choices and actions will have decades later.  Sitting down and actually coming together to work on the problems facing us would go a long way.

But instead, it seems most people just want to turn it into a generational pissing contest.

“I was spanked all the time as a kid, and I turned out fine!”

“You voted in people who drove up the price of living, and now we have to deal with it!”

“You young people are so spoiled!  You want everything handed to you!”

“You old farts don’t realize how easy you had it compared to us!”

It just goes on and on with no end.  And it solves nothing.

Every generation has their faults and successes, their pros and cons.  No one is perfect.  It’s the human condition.  So instead of assuming that one size fits all, maybe we would be better served with a multi-faceted approach to our problems.

Words are just words.  Actions are progress.

 

Thanks for reading!  Check back on the third Wednesday of next month for another post, and as always, have a wonderful month!

You can like the Rumination on the Lake Facebook page here or follow me on Twitter here.

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Let’s Talk About Joe Biden

It’s no secret that the political climate has…changed in recent years, to put it lightly.  Five years ago, few would have thought a man like Donald Trump would stand a chance at becoming president.  And yet, here we are.  The political divide and the wealth gap have only deepened in this country, and with the 2020 election cycle right around the corner it stands to reason that it’s only going to become more prevalent.  Health care and economic disparities are going to be huge talking points once again.

So yes, things have changed.  Which is why I think Joe Biden running for president might end up being a terrible idea.

 

 

Let me be clear: I have nothing against Biden personally.  I don’t know enough about the man in all honesty.  But from what little I have seen from him, I know that he will, much like Hillary Clinton in 2016, have a lot of trouble attracting younger voters.  Voter turnout may have been higher in the 2016 election than in previous years (roughly 58% of eligible voters showed up), but there was lower turnout in key areas that ultimately led to Clinton losing those electoral college votes.  And a big part of that likely had to do with younger voters’ apathy towards the Clinton campaign.  She just simply couldn’t engage them on the same level that Obama had during his run.

And I’m afraid the same thing will happen if Biden wins the nomination.  Not because he’s old or a man.  Because he’s simply…familiar.

He’s too similar to the politicians that younger generations have been railing against for years.  He claims to be a middle-class American (Middle-Class Joe), but his net worth is still probably near a million dollars.  Not to mention that since leaving office, he’s made plenty of money off of speaking gigs as signed a book deal that’s likely to bring him an even heftier sum of money.  All of these things don’t necessarily doom him, but they damage his attempt to position himself as relatable to blue-collar individuals.

And some of the things he’s said could come back to haunt him.  Last year on Trump he said he would “take him behind the gym and beat the hell out of him” if they were in high school.  It may have just been a joke, but in the world of politics perception is everything.  And then there’s what he said on income inequality: “I don’t think 500 billionaires are the reason we’re in trouble. The folks at the top aren’t bad guys. But this gap is yawning, and it’s having the effect of pulling us apart. You see the politics of it.” It’s like he’s trying to juggle having a stance on the issue while not ruffling the feathers of the big money donors that back him.  By contrast, someone like Bernie Sanders has a consistent stance on those kind of issues and isn’t held back by big, corporate money donors.

As of this writing, Biden hasn’t officially announced his campaign yet.  But he still holds a considerable margin over the other democratic candidates according to at least one poll. And maybe I’m just missing something, but he seems like just more of the same.  If he wins the nomination, Republicans will have a field day tearing down his “Middle-Class Joe” image and painting him as a stodgy, out of touch political insider.

Because this election isn’t just about defeating Trump.  It’s about breaking the cycle of politics that has been dominant for decades.  It’s about future generations finding a reason to be hopeful again.  It’s about once and for all changing things for the better.

Those that come after us deserve a chance to have a good life, rather than deal with the consequences of our excess, don’t you think?

Love Yourself

Love Yourself

Being an adult isn’t easy.  You have bills to pay.  You have to go to work.  You have to deal with every little stupid thing life throws your way.  But one of the hardest things to do as an adult might not be something you would expect:

Learning to love yourself.

And I’m not talking in a narcissistic ego-maniac type of way.  I mean in the sense that you’re comfortable in your own skin.  It might seem obvious to people out there reading this, but you’d be surprised how many people truly don’t know how to do it.  There are those that think they know how, but really all they’re doing is hiding the insecurities beneath a mask.

It’s not the type of thing you learn right away.  Oh no…it’s the type of thing that takes you right through hell and back again.  It’s the type of thing that puts you through the wringer.  But sometimes it takes your darkest hour to realize where the light shines.

Some never figure it out.  And those are usually the ones who take their own lives.

I’ve had my fair share of rough patches in the last few years.  It never got to the point that it has for some out there, but there was a decent amount of self-loathing involved.  And the thing is, I didn’t really come to an understanding on it until fairly recently.

I wrote last year about how I got to the point where I really burned out on writing.  And it took nearly another year before I realized that I took it as me somehow being a failure, rather than just a natural part of life.  Because that’s the thing: oftentimes self-loathing magnifies the insignificant things, making them seem like world-ending catastrophes.

But facing your worst self is what helps you become your best self.

 

self-worth

If self-worth were a street or some other tangible location, life would be a whole lot easier wouldn’t it?

 

Don’t ever let anyone tell you that your feelings don’t matter.  Don’t ever let anyone tell you that your problems don’t matter because other people have it worse.  That’s bullshit.  Your feelings matter.  Your problems matter.  You matter.  If you can’t take care of yourself, then how are you going to make the world a better place?

This isn’t about ego-soothing.  It’s not about being self-aggrandizing.  It’s about waking up in the morning, being able to look at yourself in the mirror, and say “hey you…you look good.  You’re doing good.  And you are good.”

 

Mirror Demon

Not you though. You’re a demon.

 

Thanks for reading.  Check back on the third Wednesday of next month for another post, and as always, have a wonderful month.

You can like the Rumination on the Lake Facebook page here or follow me on Twitter here.

Let’s Talk About Gaming Addiction

Recently the World Health Organization (WHO) has moved to include gaming disorder as part of the 11th revision of their International Classification of Diseases.  According to their website, gaming disorder is defined as “a pattern of gaming behavior (“digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterized by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.”  It goes on to say that, to be classified as a disorder, the amount of gaming must be severe enough to impair a person’s functioning in daily life for a time period of at least twelve months.

My initial reaction to this, of course, was an instinctual dislike.  Video games are one of my primary hobbies, and have been since I was a kid.  So when I heard that gaming disorder was going to be an officially recognized thing, I immediately thought that it couldn’t be good.  And the interesting thing is that the pushback against the classification didn’t just come from people who play video games.  It also came from medical experts who believe that the WHO’s definition of gaming disorder is too vague and too broad.

However, at the same time, the classification does make sense.  There are people out there who definitely spend far too much time on video games, so much so that it starts to take precedence over everything else.  And we are long overdue for a conversation about mental health in this country.  Because while conservative politicians love to blame mental health issues for mass shooting events, they never seem to actually DO anything about it.

But that’s a rant for another time.

Gaming addiction is not a new issue, especially in places like South Korea where it has become such a problem that they even have gaming addiction rehabilitation clinics.  So it’s definitely something worth talking about.  But on the other hand, there’s the media, who have a long and storied history of being slanted against video games.  For instance, here’s this story from the BBC, which was originally titled “Computer game addiction: ‘I spend 20 plus hours a week gaming”.

Pffft…that’s weak.  Get real kids.  Twenty hours is nothing.  You hear me?  Nothing!

In all seriousness, if you actually watch the video, it at least explains that the kid who plays “20 plus hours” a week is part of a healthy crowd of friends.  But if all you see is the headline, your perception of that “20 plus hours” is going to be much different.

And if we’re really going to criticize video games in this way, I think it’s worth noting how we consume another medium: television.  According to this New York Times article from back in 2016, a Nielsen study found that, on average, American adults watch five hours of television a day.  So per week, that adds up to roughly thirty-five hours of television.  Yet we don’t see the WHO coming out with a classification on television watching disorder, or the BBC making a video about people addicted to television.  And the only major reason I can think of for this is that watching television is a normalized thing, whereas video games are still seen as a kind of weird new thing that people don’t understand.

This is to say nothing about the fact that binge-watching is not only a term, but a socially acceptable one.  When “Stranger Things” season 2 came out, over three hundred thousand people watched the entire season in one day.  But of course we’re not raising a stink about this.  We might scoff and say “get a life”, but our condemnation never goes much beyond that.

I should mention here that even the WHO recognizes that the number of those afflicted with this gaming disorder are a very small percentage of the people who play video games regularly.  And I’m willing to bet that, more often than not, the root cause of the addiction lies not with the games themselves, but with something in that person’s life that has forced them to retreat into their hobby.  Because video games are typically used as a way to cope with the stresses of life, something I can attest to personally.  While there are some games that are designed to entice players to keep playing regularly over months and even years, we need to understand that the extreme form of addiction the WHO is talking about is not the norm, especially in a country where the statistic of watching over thirty hours of television a week is accepted without so much as a second thought.

In the end, it’s possible to have an unhealthy addiction to pretty much anything.  And it’s time we accepted that instead of adhering to this stodgy old idea of “everything was better when I was growing up and anything new in these kid’s lives is clearly bad for them”.

Because the world is going to change, whether we like it or not.

 

Thanks for reading!  Check back on the third Wednesday of next month for another post, and as always, have a wonderful day.

You can like the Rumination on the Lake Facebook page here or follow me on Twitter here.

Let’s Talk About Millennial Humor

Looks like those dang millennials are at it again!

So recently I stumbled across this opinion article from the Washington Post entitled “Why is millennial humor so weird?”  Let’s just start with the opening paragraph.

The article begins with a strange analysis of this particular meme:

 

 

The author writes that “the wiener is not a socialist icon; in fact, he is a breakdancing sausage from a Snapchat filter. His inclusion in a lineup of the U.S.S.R.’s patron saints doesn’t mean anything. Maybe nothing does.”

Then in the next paragraph she writes “in this weird world of the surreal and bizarre, horror mingles with humor, and young people have space to play with emotions that seem more and more to proceed from ordinary life — the creeping suspicion that the world just doesn’t make sense.”

So apparently us millennials are like the stereotypical goth kids, constantly rambling about how everything is dark and nothing has meaning.

To be fair, the author does acknowledge the reasons behind this perceived fascination with meaninglessness.  She briefly talks about how millennials, as they’re growing up, are constantly told that they should go to college, that they need to go to college.  And then when they do go to college and finish, they discover that they’ve basically been lied to.  They spent all this time getting a fancy degree, and often all that leaves them with is a mountain of debt and a part-time job at a company that couldn’t give less of a crap about them.

But at the same time, her tone occasionally feels a little too judgmental.  She references how “traditional sources of meaning, such as religion and family formation”, aren’t as relevant to millennials as they were to prior generations.  “The moral structure they produced has been vastly loosened,” she writes, “and replaced with a soft, untheorized tendency toward niceness — smarminess, really, as journalist Tom Scocca put it in 2013.”  Because if you aren’t worshipping God and making babies, then you clearly aren’t doing it right.

The article goes on to talk about how millennials put off things like buying houses and lists a whole bunch of surveys that are supposed to show how disenfranchised we are as a generation.  Now, putting aside the fact that the stuff about millennials not buying houses is simply not true, there’s one survey that popped out to me: one where fifty-seven percent of those that responded admitted to being lonely.

And where did this survey come from?  Match.com.

Oh, so you discovered that lonely people might decide to use a dating website?  GEE…NEVER WOULD HAVE FIGURED THAT ONE OUT!

 

 

What’s strangest to me about this whole rambling, presumptuous article is that it was written by a millennial.  Yep, you read that right…she states that fact multiple times in the article.  And yet, despite this display of supposed intellectualism (she even uses the phrase “de rigueur” at one point…because you can’t truly be pretentious unless you’re doing it in a different language), she appears to have only scratched the surface of how bizarre the internet can be.  A hotdog wearing green headphones?  Winnie the Pooh as a 9/11 truther in a fan-created comic?  Is that the best you’ve got?

The internet is a rabbit hole whose depths you have not even begun to fathom.

I think the biggest irony behind this whole examination of millennial humor and memes is that the article itself became a meme.  People were taking a snapshot of the article’s web page and replacing that first image with other surreal and bizarre memes.

It’s true what they say…there is no escape.

All joking and sarcasm aside, the article isn’t the worst thing I’ve ever read, but it does strike me as pointless.  It attempts to pry meaning out of a generation’s brand of humor before concluding that the meaning might be that there IS no meaning and that it’s playing with the general feelings of distress that plague the millennial generation.  But it also backs off on that point, saying that “the weird — even the exceedingly weird — doesn’t have to be purely distressing” before providing examples of more light-hearted memes.  If anything, the fact that it was written by a millennial only makes its existence more confusing.  If this was written by a forty or fifty-year old, I could at least file it under the long establish “old people don’t understand young people” genre.  But as it stands, this article just feels too full of itself to serve any real purpose.

Maybe the hotdog standing with the icons of Communism and Socialism is funny simply because of how ridiculous it is.  It doesn’t have to be some meta-commentary on the feelings of hopelessness that are common with millennials.  It doesn’t have to be part of some grander scheme or greater context.  Maybe it’s there because someone thought it would be funny.

Pro tip: if you have to spend so much time dissecting a certain brand of humor, the chances are you lost the point before you even started.

 

Thanks for reading!  Check back on the third Wednesday of next month for another post, and as always, have a wonderful month.

You can like the Rumination on the Lake Facebook page here or follow me on Twitter here.

Let’s Talk About Personal Time

You’ve likely heard or used the phrase “personal time” at some point.  Whether it’s used to explain why you don’t want to go socialize or why you’re going on vacation from work, so on and so forth, “personal time” is a phrase I’ve been thinking about a lot lately.  Ever since I posted my scheduling change announcement a couple of weeks back, I’ve been unwinding with the start of the new year, taking some time to just relax.  After last year, where I worked pretty much every weekday (working at a television station, you don’t get many holidays off, if at all), wrote a blog post every week and a short story every month…things started to get to me.  But I detailed all that in my announcement so you can read it there if you want.

Long story short, personal time has been on my mind these past couple of weeks.  It’s something I think is taken for granted far too often.

Here, in the United States, we have this widely held idea that you work until you retire and only then should you relax.  You’ll have your pension and your social security…you can truly enjoy the twilight of your years.

However, that’s not always the case.  Just recently, Senator Tina Smith (who replaced Al Franken after he stepped down) met with retired Teamsters to discuss a looming problem: they’d been asked to take a 60% cut on their pensions…pensions they say they’ve spent forty years paying into.  But because of a looming federal budget impasse, they may find themselves out of luck.  And I think this shows a key problem with the “all work and no play” mentality:

You might spend your entire life working and saving money, only to find out that the money is gone.

This is why I think it’s important to enjoy the time that you have.  I’ve never liked this whole idea of working a job you may not even like just so you can save money for the future.  Unfortunately, it’s a reality many in my generation face.  Which is why I think the idea of taking personal time off is more important than ever.  You could spend your entire working career slaving away for a business only to realize you won’t get what you were promised in the end.  You lose your pension and then what?  For some, the only option they have is to go right back to work.

Because that’s the thing with the world: it shifts and changes as time goes on.  This is something the older generations seem to misunderstand whenever they criticize “those dang kids” for complaining about their jobs.  In fact, they only seem to recognize that things are different when those differences start affecting them.

Now, this is not a blanket condemnation of old people, but it is a truth that is hard to deny.  Every generation thinks that the generation after theirs has no idea what they’re doing and is just a bunch of lazy, entitled kids.  And while that may be true in some cases, it is not in all.  Why bother drilling in this belief that “hard work is all you need” when we know that’s not the case?  Often a person who is perfectly qualified for a job and has trained for it through years of secondary education will be passed over for someone who is far less qualified simply because they happen to know someone at the company: be it a friend, former co-worker, or a family member/relative.  I’ve heard members of the older generations complaining about it too.

There’s even a word for it: nepotism.

But even beyond that, constantly working all the time eventually takes its toll on you.  I know it did for me.  By the end of the year, I was sick of writing a short story every single month, but I did it anyways.  Because that was the promise I made to myself.  And while I fulfilled that promise, I’m still left questioning whether it was worth it or not.

In 2016, the National Institute of Mental Health estimated that around 16.2 million adults in the United States suffered at least one major depressive episode.  That’s nearly seven percent of the total population.  And while that may not sound like a lot, keep in mind that this is specifically major episodes.  There could be millions more that suffered from more minor cases.

I’m not trying to call what I felt at the end of last year “depression”.  I honestly don’t know if I can even qualify it as that.  But the fact remains that the constant nose-to-the-ground work ethic isn’t really doing people any favors in this current economic landscape.  People work longer for wages that are lagging behind inflation rates, forcing those people to work multiple jobs, sometimes in conjunction with going to college.  If you don’t take some time for yourself, it can get to you fairly quickly.

I frequently find myself on Youtube watching videos about video games and other subjects as a way to unwind, and I noticed that in the past year, some of the larger Youtubers expressed a similar thought: that they were working too hard and not taking enough time for themselves.  Something not a lot of people really understand about Youtube is that it’s algorithm based, meaning that how much money you make off of it is based on things like how many videos you upload in a span of time and how much average traffic your videos get.  For a lot of the larger Youtubers, this means having to consistently upload on a schedule they set for themselves.  For those video gaming channels that upload two videos a day?  Yeah I can see how that would wear a person down.  And taking time off means possibly doing irreparable damage to your channel’s status in the Youtube Trend-o-Sphere (copyright, trademark, patent pending).

For people who depend on Youtube for their living, things can get dicey.  But even so, people have to take time off.  Because the moment you start losing your passion for your work, people will take notice.  And then you’ll lose your audience regardless.

So please, remember that taking time to yourself is not a bad thing.  It allows you to recharge and refocus, to figure out where you want to be and what you want to do.  Sometimes, you need a break.  Sometimes, you need a moment to relax.

Sometimes, you just need to breathe.

 

Thanks for reading!  Check back on the third Wednesday of February for another post, and have a wonderful January!

You can like the Rumination on the Lake Facebook page here or follow me on Twitter here.

Let’s Talk About Net Neutrality

It’s under attack…again.

On December 14th, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) here in the United States will vote on repealing the net neutrality rules set by the Obama administration.  As of right now, most experts think the vote will go through.  From what I understand, there will be five people voting on it.  It looks like two of them will be voting “no”, whereas the other three (including FCC chairman Ajit Pai) will vote “yes”.

Now why is this important?  Well let’s start by defining what net neutrality actually is.  Google defines it as “the principle that Internet service providers should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular products or websites”.  What this means is that, under the current law, you pay one price to gain access to all the internet has to offer.

Currently, the internet is classified as a Title II public utility.  It has been that way since the FCC in 2015 voted 3-2 to enact these new rules.  Now the tables have turned and it’s looking extremely likely that the current FCC will vote to roll those rules back, classifying internet as a Title I, which was the case before the 2015 rule change.

But what does this actually mean if the vote goes through?  Well…no one is really certain.  Supporters of rolling internet back to Title I typically frame their argument as pushing back against what they see as restrictive government regulation over Internet Service Providers (ISPs).  But supporters of net neutrality are worried about what ISPs might do without the restrictions.  One of the scenarios that could come to fruition would be introducing tiered service packages, which would essentially mean that if you want to access something like Netflix, you might have to pay more money.

This is a graphic that has been circulating for a long time, showing what this scenario might look like:

 

 

Yeah…it’s not pretty.  And there is at least one real world case of this in the form of Portugal, where internet plans look a lot like cable plans do here in the United States.  Now it isn’t one hundred percent certain that it’ll happen, but if a huge company like Comcast is given the opportunity to make more money, do you really think they won’t jump at the chance?

This is where net neutrality opponents (like Pai himself) will say that if an ISP does something that people don’t like, then the market will decide their fate.  This means that people will switch to another service provider who doesn’t do those things, and the service provider who does will go out of business.  Now that’s all well and good as an argument…

…except that it’s total bullshit.

Here’s the thing: this argument only makes sense in a market where there are many different companies competing for the same space.  But that’s not so with internet service providers.  Many places only give you one or two choices for internet providers.  Where I live, for example, I have the choice between CenturyLink and Charter, which is essentially the choice between DSL and Cable.  Which is basically the choice between crap and not-crap.  I had CenturyLink for internet back when I lived with a roommate, and we had random disconnects all the time before they managed to fix it.  We called them more times than I care to remember, and it took them literally almost a year before they figured out “oh hey, if we switch the port they’re on, it fixes the problem”.  So switching to Charter was a no-brainer.  But if Charter starts throttling my internet speed or forcing me to pay extra for Netflix, I don’t really have any other place to go.  I just have to deal with it.  And that’s the case for many people, some of whom have less choice than I do.

A lot of net neutrality opponents love to phrase their agenda as “restoring internet freedom”.  But with the current market, the only thing repealing the Title II classification stands to do is allow internet providers to gouge their customers.  And while Pai has argued that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will protect consumers from unfair practices, an Ars Technica article points out that a pending court case is poised to strip the FTC of its authority on the matter.  Without any protection, consumers will find themselves at the mercy of internet companies.  And that is not a situation that is likely to turn out well.

Also, does anyone else find it just a little too convenient that Ajit Pai previously worked for Verizon?  I’m sure there’s nothing going on there at all…

Now, there are ways you can voice your opinion on the matter.  There are sites like Battle for the Net which will help you contact Congress and inform them of your opposition to the vote.  You can call the FCC itself at 1-888-225-5322 and inform them of your opposition as well.  And it’s not like you’ll be alone.  When the FCC did an open comment period on the issue of net neutrality, a study estimated that a whopping 98.5 percent of non-spam comments were in support of net neutrality and against the FCC’s intention to roll back the Title II classification.  And not only that, but another Ars Technica article found that 50,000 customer complaints against internet providers were excluded from the FCC’s net neutrality repeal docket.  It’s as if the FCC is willfully ignoring these comments in favor of pushing their agenda.

Will our voices actually sway the vote?  I can’t really say.  But if you’re one of those people who feels the need to do something, there are options out there.  Tell them your opinion.  Scream it at them if you have to.  At the very least, they’ll know we won’t be silenced so easily.

 

Thanks for reading.  Check back next Wednesday for a new post, and as always, have a wonderful week.

You can like the Rumination on the Lake Facebook page here or follow me on Twitter here.