Spotlight: Stories Untold

Dude…this game?  This game dude.  THIS GAME.

It’s been a long time since I’ve been legitimately surprised by a game.  Stories Untold is a game I just stumbled into one day when browsing the Steam store.  It’s actually a very recent game too, as it came out at the end of February this year.  Reading the description on its Steam page doesn’t tell you a whole lot.  But that’s the point.

You see, Stories Untold benefits from you not knowing a lot about it.  It’s a game that revels in its mystery and in messing with the player’s head.  It’s an anthology game of sorts divided into four short “episodes” that you play through, each with their own kind of theme and setting.  For example, the first episode has you playing a fictitious text adventure game called “The House Abandon”, which of course features an empty house that you have to explore (fun fact: The House Abandon was a free game made by the developers before they made Stories Untold).

But the fact that you are playing the game on a computer WITHIN the game should cue you in to the fact that things are not going to be what they seem.

 

 

That’s a big part of the reason why this review is so hard to write, because the game works best when you don’t know what to expect.  So to that end, I’m going to be as spoiler-free as I can.  But I will tell you this: by the end of the first episode I was hooked.  I wanted to play more.  I wanted to see what other spooks and tricks the game had in store.

Stories Untold is classified as a horror game, although some would probably say it’s not that scary.  But that’s fine, because Stories Untold doesn’t rely so much on jumpscares and loud noises to scare you.  It’s a psychological game that gets under your skin as you play.  It creates a kind of tension that gnaws on you, especially after the first episode because you start expecting things to go pear-shaped at any moment.

 

The second episode involves a mysterious laboratory experiment.

 

The episodes all play out in the same fashion (for the most part).  You are put into some kind of setting, rooted in one spot, and you have to figure out what you’re supposed to do.  The first episode is pretty straight forward if you’re even slightly familiar with text adventure games, but the other episodes require you to think a bit more.  This is especially evident in the third episode.  In it, you have to decode a bunch of radio frequencies, which requires you to use a finicky microfilm reader.  The tasks get more and more complex as the episode goes on, and at one part has you translating Morse Code.  I enjoyed the episode, but I can see why it would get tedious for some people.

 

Damn you microfilm…DAMN YOUUUUUU!

 

And that’s how each episode progresses, through different kinds of puzzles.  Unfortunately, this is where Stories Untold sometimes drops the ball.  Occasionally the puzzles are frustratingly obtuse, with no clear indication of how you’re supposed to progress.  This is especially true with the text adventure bits, as the word parser it uses sometimes won’t recognize the phrase you’re using even if it is the right thing to do (i.e. typing “open door with key” won’t work but “use key” will).  I know I ran into a minor roadblock near the beginning of the first episode.  The game was telling me to find a generator around the back of the house, but when I went back there the description didn’t say anything about a generator.  Turns out I had to type in “look around” as a command before I could find it, which took me a few minutes to figure out.

Occasionally frustrating puzzles aside, the presentation in this game is fantastic.  Everything has a retro science-fiction feel to it, from the computer interfaces to the glossy shine everything has over it.  The stories have an old-school sci-fi vibe to them as well, reminding me of anthology shows like The Twilight Zone or Outer Limits.  The story does sometimes get a little trite and cliche (especially in the final episode).  But I’ll say this: while Stories Untold might not always tell the most original story, it certainly tells its story in an original way.

So if you’re interested in unique storytelling and horror, I highly recommend giving this game a look.  It’s one of the more unique video games I’ve come across, and I thoroughly enjoyed playing through it.  It’s not a very long game, clocking in around two to four hours long (I completed it in just under three).  But it’s something that should be experienced.  Sure, you could go read what it’s all about, but that would spoil the magic of the game.  I’m glad I went in not knowing a lot about the game because it blew my mind, especially with the first episode.

If you like stories in video games, give Stories Untold a shot.  You won’t regret it.

 

Thanks for reading!  Check back next Wednesday for another post, and as always, have a wonderful week!

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